History of a Word

Dogastrophe

[dawg-as-truh-fee]

Noun.
⦁ A sudden and widespread fantastic thing that just happened
⦁ Any misfortune, mishap, or failure that was avoided, and instead something amazing happened in its place.
⦁ A bunch of dogs just hanging out in one place.

Believed to be first used right after the Great Depression of 1929, this word gained popularity as North American families transitioned into a suburban life. Sick of the negative connotation of its sister word, dogastrophe became a common word in the English language because it promoted positivity and good will. During this time, dogs became more accepted in the household and brought with them good joy and comradery, and the population wanted a word that reflected that.

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